Tag Archives: luxury

Digital snippets: Fabergé, Dior, Gucci, Marc by Marc Jacobs, H&M, J.Crew and Kate Spade

13 Apr

A round-up of the latest stories to know about surrounding all things fashion and tech:

 

  • Fabergé’s NYC Easter egg hunt marks the largest Beacon deployment ever in the US [Fashionista]
  • Dior explores global flower sourcing with interactive map [Luxury Daily]
  • James Franco directs video for Gucci (as above) [WWD]
  • Marc by Marc Jacobs line crowdsources models with #castmemarc campaign on social [Vogue.co.uk]
  • YouTube fashion viral: Miranda Kerr is selfie obsessed in H&M’s spring 2014 campaign [Fashionotes]
  • J.Crew and Kate Spade to foster the next big fashion tech start-ups through new accelerator program [Co.Design]
  • IMG Fashion’s partnership with Tencent aims to boost Fashion Week China exposure  [JingDaily] bit.ly/1ltgJFZ
  • Fashion in the age of Instagram [NY Times]
  • How iBeacon and similar technology will change retail [eMarketer]
  • Five examples of how marketers are using iBeacons [Econsultancy]
  • ‘Showrooming’ hits luxury fashion – lack of e-commerce presence means clients buying elsewhere online [WSJ]
  • Luxury brands are stupid to snub the internet [BusinessWeek]
  • Decoded Fashion founder: ‘Designers need to launch like start-ups’ [The Guardian]
  • New app, Think Dirty, tracks the nasty chemicals in the beauty products you put on your face [Co.Exist]
  • The camera-wielding boyfriends behind fashion’s most famous bloggers [Fashionista]
  • How LiketoKnow.it is changing Instagram by monetising your photos [Pinetop Group]
  • Op-ed: The companies with the best software will lead fashion [BoF]

Fabergé fans to create digital portrait animations at Harrods

26 Mar

Fabergé Cinescope - Firebird in Cage

Fabergé is set to host a heritage-inspired digital installation in Harrods as part of its Easter-themed pop-up from April 1 – 21.

The ‘Fabergé Cinescope’ will enable visitors to try on jewellery via a digital mirror and then create a one-of-a-kind animated portrait of themselves that can be shared across social media.

These portraits are based on a Victorian novelty concept – the trompe-l’oeil optical effect created by placing two images on either side of a disk and rotating them quickly to make them look like one (as per the video below).

Fabergé says marrying innovation with tradition is always its aim, and in this case its “transforming a period toy into a digital-age concept”.

The initiative is being run in collaboration with Russian style icon Miroslava Duma. It will also see the story of the Fabergé jewellery house retold via the Harrods windows, and an ‘Egg Bar’ showcasing the iconic precious egg pendants. An exhibition space will present other historic pieces from the brand, including the original 1901 Fabergé Apple Blossom Egg never seen before in the UK.

Digital snippets: Wren, Gucci, John Lewis, Lord & Taylor, Kenneth Cole, Sephora

18 Mar

A bit of a catch-up post today in light of several weeks of travel… here then all the latest stories to know about surrounding fashion and tech from the past fortnight or so:

 

  • “First Kiss” film (as above) goes viral with 63 million views – is ad for clothing label Wren [NY Times]
  • Gucci launches own Spotify music hub to promote short film ‘The Fringe’ [The Drum]
  • John Lewis looks to digital innovation as next big thing in retail with ‘JLab incubator’ [The Guardian]
  • Lord & Taylor now accepting bitcoin [CNBC]
  • Kenneth Cole challenges consumers to do good deeds and prove it via Google Glass [Creativity]
  • Sephora launches ‘Beauty Board’ social shopping platform [USA Today]
  • Bergdorf Goodman makes Instagram shots shoppable at SXSW with 52Grams [5th/58th]
  • Dolce & Gabbana crafts love story around perfume to appeal to consumer emotion [Luxury Daily
  • adidas launches gaming platform powered by social media starring Lionel Messi [Marketing Magazine]
  • Can Instagram save ageing teen retailer Aeropostale? [CNBC]
  • Which big brands are courting the maker movement, and why – from Levi’s to Home Depot  [AdWeek]
  • How beacon technology could change the way we shop [Fashionista]
  • On Instagram, a bazaar where you least expect it [Bits blog]
  • What Google’s wearable tech platform could mean for the fashion industry [Fashionista]
  • Smartphone payment system to be unveiled in UK [FT]
  • Alibaba ramping up efforts to sell US brands in China [WSJ]
  • What does WeChat’s new e-credit card mean for luxury? [JingDaily]
  • Op-Ed | Are camera phones killing fashion? [BoF]

Digital snippets: adidas, Louis Vuitton, Neiman Marcus, Bitcoin, American Apparel

20 Jan

Here’s a highlight of the best stories in the fashion and tech space over the past couple of weeks…

adidas_Stan_Smith_Popup

  • adidas launches Stan Smith pop-up store, includes 3D-printing station (as pictured) [Dexigner]
  • Louis Vuitton debuts spring campaign on Instagram [Refinery29]
  • Neiman Marcus CEO apologises for data breach, offers free credit monitoring [The Verge]
  • Overstock CEO: Why we’re accepting Bitcoins [CNBC]
  • Five reasons why American Apparel is bullish on Twitter [AdWeek]
  • Aerie’s unretouched ads ‘challenge supermodel standards’ for young women [Huffington Post]
  • Warby Parker launches interactive 2013 annual report [Laughing Squid]
  • Wet Seal hires 16-year-old to build its following on Snapchat [AdAge]
  • François-Henri Pinault puts his money where his mobile is via Square, hints at future for luxury world buying into tech [FT Material World]
  • Show business: are fashion shows still relevant? [BoF]
  • Beacons: what they are, how they work, and why Apple’s iBeacon technology is ahead of the pack [Business Insider]
  • Personalisation is key for beauty omnichannel strategy: L’Oréal Luxe exec [Luxury Daily]
  • Try on virtual make-up and pay with your hand with retail tech at CES 2014 [BrandChannel]

Digital snippets: Burberry and Apple executive special

15 Oct

The big news today has of course been about Burberry CEO Angela Ahrendts’ move to become an SVP at Apple, as well as the subsequent announcement of Christopher Bailey’s new title covering her role as well as his existing one as chief creative officer at the luxury brand. Here are the must-read stories on it:

AngelaAhrendts_ChristopherBailey

  • As outlined in a statement from Apple, Ahrendts’ role will be to have “oversight of the strategic direction, expansion and operation of both Apple retail and online stores”. She will join the company by mid-2014 and report directly into Apple CEO Tim Cook
  • Meanwhile, a tweet from Warby Parker co-founder Neil Blumenthal said the announcement is a signifier of how the “convergence of fashion and technology continues”, a sentiment that’s been echoed elsewhere. Vanessa Friedman of the FT wrote: “It also demonstrates the increasing give and take between luxury and tech, as great personal gadgets become luxury accessories, design plays a big role in brand equity, and luxury increasingly becomes tech-savvy”
  • Let’s not forget, Ahrendts is the second senior fashion executive to be hired by Apple this year. As reported by The Business of Fashion, Paul Deneve, former chief executive of Yves Saint Laurent joined Apple in July, and is thought to be working on wearable devices
  • But Ahrendts offers Apple another significant value too; namely understanding China. As highlighted by Quartz: “It is also gaining the expertise of one of the most successful luxury brands in China, which happens to be the world’s largest smartphone market and one of Apple’s target markets”
  • Over at The Telegraph there’s a great outline of how the first Apple Store came about under Steve Jobs, and grew to its 408 locations worldwide today. But it highlights how Ahrendts will not inherit a business without challenges. “Rivals such as Samsung and Microsoft have copied the Apple Store template and are expanding their own retail footprints around the world,” it says. And: “Apple retail has been without permanent leader for over a year following the brief tenure of former Dixons chief John Browett, who took over after Ron Johnson left in 2011 for the top job at JC Penney.”
  • But there’s also an argument the move is a bit of a step down for her – from the top of the pile at Burberry (not to mention the highest paid CEO on the FTSE 100 last year) to another fish in a big pond at Apple. Mashable has a few thoughts on that however, including the fact Apple could be grooming her for the CEO role in the future. It also outlines that Apple’s retail revenues are about seven times that of Burberry. (There’s some nice background info in this piece about the impact Ahrendts has made at Burberry too)
  • Meanwhile, the news of Bailey as Ahrendts’ successor at Burberry (taking on the dual role of chief creative and chief executive officer) has been met with mixed response. Shares dropped 7.6% on London’s stock exchange today, suggesting there’s not a great deal of confidence surrounding it, despite enormous backing from Ahrendts and from Burberry’s chairman Sir John Peace in the brand’s video announcement. During this, Bailey himself refers to the fact the brand has “only just started dreaming”, mentioning future strategies surrounding beauty and re-integrating Japan back into the business
  • As the Guardian reported, there were suggestions Bailey had been handed the top job to stop him following Ahrendts out of the door, though Burberry was forced to deny it. It instead reinforced the support he has in the rest of the company management team; in spite of the fact finance director Carol Fairweather only stepped into the role  in July this year, and chief operating officer John Smith joined in March
  • Another piece from The Business of Fashion notes  it is “truly unprecedented for a designer to graduate from creative director to chief creative officer to chief executive officer, as Bailey will have done when the transition is complete”. It asks: “Can Mr Bailey, someone who is not obviously au fait with the dollars and cents of balance sheets, intricacies of global supply chains and the excruciating detail of retail operations, run a multi-billion dollar creative business in every sense of the word and also communicate with analysts on Wall Street and in the City of London?”
  • As Friedman at the FT likewise says: “Now we have an art-school-trained man without an MBA atop a £7bn public company – albeit one who was always referred to by Ms Ahrendts as a “partner”. And we have final confirmation that these days, corporate and creative are becoming one and the same when it comes to high-end fashion. Argue all you want about whether or not it is a good development for either side (and I betcha people will argue) – the fact remains it has happened.”

Pic via Fast Company

How fashion brands are using Vine

30 Jun Fashionbrands_Vine_banner

This article first appeared on Mashable

Fashionbrands_Vine

The fashion industry immediately embraced Vine, Twitter’s 6-second video app, after it launched in February. It was no surprise it was suddenly so popular: The app was released just two weeks before New York Fashion Week kicked off, a time when behind-the-scenes runway shots were readily available to capture and share in 6-second loops.

But Vine is much more difficult to make look beautiful and polished than Instagram photos, and brands quickly discovered that to participate, they needed to relax their typically stringent production quality requirements. Perhaps that’s why, following the shows, most fashion houses dropped the platform altogether, only returning to it, in some cases, for the menswear shows in London and Milan earlier this month.

That’s not to say that Vine’s fashion future is dead — it’s merely getting a slow start. Early data indicates that Vine videos are shared four times as often as other kinds of Internet video, and the launch of video for Instagram, which many brands have already enthusiastically adopted, is creating further incentive for fashion firms to ramp up their capabilities and resources in this area.

Let’s take a look at a few fashion brands using Vine to exceptional effect…

Stop motion art

Stop-motion artists are among Vine’s most popular users. Eyeing this trend, French Connection collaborated with photographer Meagan Cignoli to create a series of highly shareable, summer-themed stop-motion videos. In one video, the brand’s latest collection packs itself into a suitcase for a holiday. In another, various outfits are laid out and rolled up on the beach.

Cignoli tells me that each video typically has between 100 and 120 separately recorded clips. The result is incredibly fluid and eye-catching, instantly negating any notion that Vine can’t be a platform for quality creative work. Online retailer Nasty Gal is another standout for stop-motion inspiration, weaving playful, wiggling pieces of candy in and around products like handbags, shoes and makeup. Burberry, too, has used stop-motion video to showcase product prints and patterns, as well as celebrities present at its last menswear show.

Showcasing product details

The beauty of the French Connection work by Cignoli is that it places products front and center, but it’s so creative it doesn’t feel like marketing. Marc Jacobs is another example of a designer who is doing this, releasing some nice stop-motion work that features handbags on what looks like a rotating conveyor belt.

For others, Vine presents an opportunity to demonstrate the work that goes into making products. Matthew Williamson did this during London Fashion Week in February with his #matthewmagnified campaign, and Oscar de la Renta, through the handle OscarPRGirl, used Vine to detail the craftsmanship that goes into its bridalwear pieces.

Gap is also using Vine to highlight key pieces in-store, but takes a more editorial approach, employing models for its videos. In one, a woman spins around in an assortment of dresses. In another, a young girl plays in the latest DVF GapKids collection in the park. These are much more developed than the clips that debuted during fashion week season: a haphazard amalgamation of garments on hangers and poorly lit models on runways.

Injecting personality

Some brands’ Vine videos manage to be both beautifully produced and full of personality.

Urban Outfitters released short videos that are playful yet stylish at the same time. In one clip, a bunch of balloons float into an office. In another, the contents of a purse are being prepared ahead of a festival trip. In another stop-motion video, makeup carries itself into a bag. It’s worth noting that with more than 40,000 followers, Urban Outfitters is one of the most popular brands on Vine, proving that volume and frequency of posts can be a more successful formula than fewer, higher quality videos — as showcased by French Connection, which has just a fraction of Urban Outfitters’ followers.

Behind the scenes

As mentioned, fashion brands released a great deal of behind-the-scenes content on Vine during fashion week season. This is a trend that’s continued since the shows, with brands and retailers providing windows into their corporate headquarters, design studios and individual stores.

Marc Jacobs has used Vine to take followers on many journeys at its headquarters and stores, from the creation of its latest Resort collection campaign to celebrity interviews during in-store book signings. Using the hashtag #staffstyles, Marc Jacobs frequently showcases the prints and patterns worn by its employees. In another example, Bergdorf Goodman features staffers as they try on different pairs of sunglasses. The video is tied to a message about sun protection.

Puma recently released a series of Vine videos featuring Olympic champion Usain Bolt on the set of his latest campaign for the brand. The quick all-access videos, shot again by Cignoli, frequently allow Bolt’s own personality to come through. Meanwhile, Nordstrom has shown what it’s like at its stores after hours, with shoes whimsically moving about on shelves when customers aren’t there. In another video, a flying shirt leads followers on a magical tour through merchandise.

Beyond the obvious

One thing fashion and retail brands haven’t taken advantage of is the how-to video, which is a popular hashtag on Vine. Bergdorfs has done a beauty tutorial and Nordstrom has used Vine to show how to tie a tie, but there are plenty more opportunities here.

As autumn’s busy event calendar gets rolling and the fall collections hit stores, expect to see more behind-the-scenes footage as well as more close-up product shots. Though some brands’ participation has been impeded by corporate approval processes, there’s no doubt — especially with the recent launch of video on Instagram — that short-form video will become a more central part of the fashion industry’s output.

As Cignoli advises: “Fashion brands just need to let go a little and enjoy Vine for what it is, the quickness and easiness of it. If they can find a way to do that, it’s going to be much more beneficial even if what’s going out isn’t always the most amazing piece of content.”

Do you have any favorite fashion brands you follow on Vine?

Digital snippets: 3D printing, Burberry, Barneys, Karl Lagerfeld, Fendi, Primark

25 Jun nike_banner

Time for yet another catch-up on recent stories from around the web surrounding all things fashion and digital:

nike_3dprintingSHOE

  • New stamping ground for Nike and adidas as 3D shoes kick off (as pictured) [FT]
  • How Burberry uses Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and Google+ [Econsultancy]
  • Barneys targets social-savvy men via new Instagram account [Luxury Daily]
  • Fendi to unveil revamped website [WWD]
  • Primark makes online debut with Asos partnership [Marketing]
  • Retailers’ digital ad spending nears $10 billion [Mashable]
  • Apple-like ecosystems for luxury brands? [BoF]
  • Gilt launches first brick-and-mortar retail store [PSFK]
  • Fab raises $150 million from investors in China, Japan [Mashable]
  • Rad, a Parisian hipster fashion portal, gets $3.3m led by Index to go international [TechCrunch]

Burberry and Google bring emotion to digital with virtual kissing campaign

13 Jun Burberry Kisses - Skyline (London)

Burberry Kisses

The latest digital innovation from Burberry sees a reimagination of the classic love letter, as fans around the world are able to send and share virtual kisses with one another.

Burberry Kisses, as it’s called, is a partnership with Google that combines personalised content and new technology in a bid to bring an element of emotion to online communications.

Users are able to send an impression of their own real kisses to loved ones by either using their desktop webcams via Google Chrome or by having direct lip contact with their touch screen devices. This so-named “kiss recognition technology” captures the outline of the pout, from which one of five Burberry lip colours can be added to dress it up, and a message typed in to the intended recipient.

On sending, both parties will see personalised animated content dependent on where in the world they are and where they’ve sent their kiss to, thanks to Google Earth and Google Streetview technology. The skylines of New York, Hong Kong, London and more are each shown for instance as the love note flies through the air to its destination. Detail also appears in puddles reflecting local views and recognisable street names.

The aim, according to the company, is to “humanise technology”, and to “translate the emotion of what we create and experience in the real world, into the digital space”.

Christopher Bailey, Burberry’s chief creative officer, said: “We’re constantly thinking about how we translate the emotion of what we create and experience in the real world into the digital space, whether that’s capturing the energy and excitement of a live gig, the hum and buzz of anticipation before a runway show, or just the feeling you get when you pull on your trench coat on a rainy morning. Burberry Kisses began with the idea of giving technology a bit of heart and soul, and using it to unite the Burberry family across the world – by telling a story that makes the digital personal.”

The soundtrack, Evergreen Love, by British Burberry Acoustic musician Misty Miller, was also chosen to provide “emotional resonance”. All outcomes can of course be shared over Google+, as well as the other usual social platforms.

The entire project will be captured in a World of Kissses map. This has two views – a real-time interactive version that shows ‘live’ kisses as they move around the world, and an ‘all’ option that reveals the cities sending and receiving the most.

The initiative is part of Google’s Art, Copy & Code series, which will be showcased during next week’s Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity.

BurberryKisses1Burberry Kisses - Skyline (New York)Burberry Kisses - World of Kisses

Digital snippets: DKNY, Chanel, Mary Meeker, Karl Lagerfeld, Jaeger, Lululemon

10 Jun DKNY-Art-App

A round-up of recent stories from around the web surrounding all things fashion and digital:

DKNY_timessquare

  • DKNY campaign combines art with augmented reality (as pictured) [Mashable]
  • Mary Meeker’s annual internet trends report highlights mobile momentum, wearables and digital China [BOF]
  • Karl Lagerfeld opens concept store complete with social media dressing rooms and wearable cash registers [PSFK]
  • Jaeger’s relaunched e-commerce site deconstructed [Econsultancy]
  • Lululemon uses digital to build local communities [L2 Think Tank]
  • Zegna group Tumblr bows [WWD]
  • Sears turning old department stores into data centres [Fast Company]
  • China e-commerce: Why Tmall works [BoF]
  • Six brands that have been busy experimenting with Google Hangouts, including Asos, Glamour [Econsultancy]

How digital innovation is changing the face of fashion

8 May v2banner5

Interested in some key thoughts on where the fashion industry is at with social media, mobile and digital strategy? My knowledge has just been tested by Poq Studio, a company making apps and mobile sites for brands and retailers in this space, and posted in the form of a Q&A over on their blog.

Do check it out – I would love to hear your feedback.

Thank you in the meantime to the team over there for both the invitation and the kind introduction in the piece!

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