Tag Archives: BoF

Digital snippets: Alexander Wang, Warby Parker, Gucci, Nars, Ray Ban, J Crew + more

3 Mar Wang

It’s been a little while since one of these round-up posts on other interesting fashion and digital stories sourced from around the web, so there’s far more than usual. Each of them is however, of course, as interesting and relevant as ever…

  • Alexander Wang teams up with Samsung for crowdsourced handbag (as above) [Mashable]
  • Google reportedly in talks with Warby Parker to design stylish Google Glass frames [Techcrunch]
  • Gucci ups mobile conversion 70% via optimised site [Luxury Daily]
  • Nars tests Pinterest’s selling potential [Mashable]
  • Ray Ban launches real-life ambermatic lens app installation [DigitalBuzzBlog]
  • This is personal: J Crew debuts an in-store styling app [Refinery29]
  • How John Lewis uses Pinterest, Facebook, Twitter and Google+ [Econsultancy]
  • Lizzy Caplan’s Viva Vena fashion film is one of the best satirical ads you’ll ever see [Slate]
  • The business of blogging: Garance Doré [BoF]
  • Shopping in the future: Glasses.com’s augmented reality fitting-room app [AllThingsD]
  • Will Apple’s plans for an iWatch herald a new era of wearable tech? [The Observer]
  • Farfetch fashion hub: meet the curator of curators [Wired]
  • Business Of Fashion gets $2.1m seed funding from Index, LVMH and more for its no-nonsense B2B fashion blog [Techcrunch]
  • How your tweets during fashion shows are driving sales [Fashionista]
  • Fashion buys into social tools [NY Times]
  • Online upstarts explore a new model for fashion media [BoF]
  • Why retailers are pinning hopes on Pinterest [Reuters]
  • 10 great uses of Vine during fashion week [The Cut]

Digital snippets: Burberry, Marc Jacobs, Tom Ford, Nicolas Ghesquière, Hunter, G-Star, Dita von Teese

15 Jan Burberry_romeobeckham

Some more great stories from around the web surrounding all things fashion and digital over the past week or so:

 

  • Watch Romeo Beckham run circles around his fellow Burberry models in SS13 campaign video (as above) [Telegraph Fashion]
  • How Marc Jacobs is amping up the luxury e-commerce experience [PSFK]
  • Tom Ford will even be inviting bloggers to his first ‘real’ runway show [Styleite]
  • Nicolas Ghesquière’s first-ever tweet: an analysis [The Cut]
  • Hunter takes control of British weather in global Facebook campaign [Campaign]
  • G-Star Raw launches animated video campaign [WWD]
  • Dita von Teese sews QR codes directly into her clothing [PSFK]
  • Op-ed: Fashion’s unsung internet forums [BoF]
  • Do people actually shop on phones? The answer is decidedly yes [NY Times]
  • Shoedazzle taps Rachel Zoe as new celebrity spokesperson [AllThingsD]

Digital snippets: Jimmy Choo, Uniqlo, Nike, Michael Kors, Dolce & Gabbana, Amazon

14 May

Some more great stories from around the web surrounding all things fashion and digital over the past week:

 

  • Digital scorecard: Jimmy Choo 24:7 Stylemakers [BoF]
  • Uniqlo bids you good morning with new social app (as video above) [Co.Create]
  • The New York Times expanding street style coverage [WWD]
  • Dolce & Gabbana presents new eyewear collection with silent short film [Luxury Daily]
  • Amazon leaps into high end of the fashion pool [NY Times]
  • The Bottom Line: Pinterest vs Facebook [BoF]
  • Styku: how Microsoft’s Kinect could replace your tailor [Fast Company]

BOF: Looking back at #SXSW Interactive

17 Mar

Covering the rise of the connected fan, through to the uneven impact of curation, not to mention the success of Nike and Amex in Austin, this is a great round-up piece by The Business of Fashion on everything that happened during SXSW Interactive. Check it out.

#SXSW Interactive: Fashion’s greatest challenge lies in realigning production with communications

16 Mar

“If I were the CEO of a major fashion brand today, my focus would be on trying to compress the production cycle so it realigned with communications,” Imran Amed, founder and editor of The Business of Fashion, said at SXSW earlier this week.

Speaking on a panel called Who needs a fashion cycle? I’ve got social media, he explained that we’re at the beginning of a seismic change in the way consumers communicate with each other, make decisions, and ultimately purchase.  It’s only by changing the operational side of what we do, he said, that we’re going to be able to catch up.

As we all know, the internet has revolutionised this industry. Where once fashion shows were private trade events, now they’re more consumer facing than ever before, highlighted Michelle Sadlier, global digital communications consultant for Karla Otto International, and moderator of the session.

Designer collections used to only be seen by the public when they hit shop floors six months later – or the pages of the magazines just before. Now they’re viewable in real-time. The likes of Twitter and Instagram, not to mention bloggers and live-streams, mean consumers have the same level of access, at exactly the same time, as those invited to the catwalk presentations.

The issue of course, is that the operational side of the process is still the same. Rather than speeding up alongside, production has remained a lengthy and complicated system. The user is subsequently seeing something online, that isn’t available to buy for a further four to six months.

This gap, said Chris Morton, founder and CEO of fashion discovery site Lyst, means brands are missing out on capturing that “intent to purchase at the point of inspiration”.

He referenced a handful of companies attempting to address this: Burberry’s Runway to Reality initiative – where viewers can shop straight from the catwalk for delivery in just eight weeks – for example, as well as start-up Moda Operandi, which offers a similar solution across a variety of brand names.

Lyst itself launched a Runway Tracking service last September, which at least reminds consumers of the items they liked, by sending them a notification once they’re available to buy.

Amed however, said while each of these ideas is attempting to work around the issues, they’re not actually solving the problem. This is the industry’s biggest challenge, he added, and there’s no easy solution.

One of his suggestions was to create two separate events around the shows. One small and quiet for trade to see the season ahead, and the other a big, all-out affair for consumers, timed so it’s in sync with the actual season. So in other words, shifting the position of the fashion show as we know it today, so it sits at the end of the cycle rather than the beginning.

Of course to do so, would mean skipping a season, something Natalie Massanet, founder of Net-a-Porter, first suggested to Amed in an interview in 2010. No mean feat to pull off…

Which takes us back full circle to the very first line of this post. At the end of the day the company that masters how to realign the production cycle with the communications one, will be the one that finds success. And the likeliest way of achieving that right now, is by focusing first on compressing operations.

Watch this space.

#SXSW Interactive: a new must on the fashion calendar

15 Mar

I have just returned from the most incredible week at SXSW Interactive, where speakers varied from Al Gore and Sean Parker, to Ray Kurweil, Biz Stone and Dennis Crowley.

I’m in the midst of finishing off a piece on the key thoughts and ideas from the week – to be published elsewhere [UPDATE: if you're interested please email me for a copy].

In the meantime, I wanted to write one very short and simple blogpost that says, if you’re a fashion brand aiming to achieve anything along the lines of digital success, you need to go next year.

SXSW is the place to hear industry leaders (aforementioned and more) give expert insights; it’s the place to learn about new innovations and source fresh inspirations; and it’s the place where trends and directions for the tech world break.

But more importantly, it’s the hottest place to network with anyone and everyone also working in this space. Serendipity as Mashable calls it here. From meeting new start-ups and coordinating with established platforms, to swapping ideas with those from your own industry, it’s the perfect playing ground for getting your head both in the game and ahead of the curve.

And if that isn’t convincing enough, it speaks volumes to see which brands are already doing it. There this year were teams from Burberry, Victoria’s Secret, Calvin Klein, Ralph Lauren, DKNY, Neiman Marcus, Bergdorfs, Net-a-Porter and Moda Operandi… not to mention fashion-specific platforms including Lyst and publications from The Business of Fashion and WGSN, to Fashion’s Collective.

It was undoubtedly one of the most valuable experiences of my career to date.

I hope to see you there in 2013!

Digital snippets: Oscar PR Girl, Daphne Guinness for Printemps, Narciso Rodriguez, FashionStake

22 Jan

Some more great stories from around the web surrounding all things fashion and digital this week:

  • Oscar PR Girl joins Pinterest (as pictured) [Pinterest]
  • Here’s why Pinterest works better than Google+ [ReadWriteWeb]
  • Daphne Guinness to play virtual mannequin at Printemps using cutting-edge three-dimensional scanning technology [WWD]
  • Narciso Rodriguez to create exclusive line for online retail store Rent the Runway [PSFK]
  • Why brands including Tiffany & Co, Puma and Burberry are using Instagram [AdAge]
  • New e-commerce business models, including personal subscription, social merchandising, mass customisation and collaborative consumption [BoF]
  • Fab.com acquires FashionStake after seven months of rapid growth [All Things D]
  • Women’s Wear Daily launches on iPad [Mashable]

Digital snippets: Jimmy Choo, The Sartorialist, Target, Jamie Beck, New Look, Polyvore

10 Oct

Some more great stories from around the web surrounding all things fashion and digital over the past week:

 

  • Target website issues continue; “plagued by glitches” [AdAge]
  • Profiling From Me To You’s Jamie Beck and Kevin Burg: how a blogging duo is changing fashion photography with animated cinemagraphs [Mashable]
  • New Look launches first iPhone app, designed for use in-store [New Media Age]
  • Polyvore creates monthly magazine [AdWeek]
  • Publishers say tablet business is picking up; $10m for Condé Nast and Hearst not far off [WWD]

Dolce & Gabbana launches e-commerce site

12 Jul

Dolce & Gabbana is set to open its online store tomorrow in partnership with e-commerce website Yoox.

Dolcegabbanastore.com will be available in seven languages across computer, mobile and social networks, offering both men’s and women’s apparel and accessories.

“We’re fascinated by the idea of opening a boutique that’s available to the entire world. We’ve believed in the power of the web right from day one. Now, even people not living in large cities will be able to experience the Dolce & Gabbana world,” said Domenico Dolce and Stefano Gabbana.

The aim of the e-store is to offer the product within the narrative of the brand, meaning a strong editorial focus will surround the merchandising.

“Shop by look” pages will provide the feel of a magazine, while photos will be viewable in 360° and videos will accompany each look.

Delivery on the site will be free for the first three months.

Meanwhile, there’s a great post on The Business of Fashion today featuring a video interview with Domenico Dolce and Stefano Gabbana talking about their digital strategy for the first time.

“[They] speak candidly, not only about the way they use digital technology in their business, but also how it has impacted their own lives, and how this has changed the way they work with each other, and with their teams,” reads the accompanying text.

Check it out below:

 

A quick look at Dolce & Gabbana’s digital history:

- 2004: Dolce & Gabbana opens its mobile channel, a step ahead of the smartphone wave
- 2005: The first fashion shows available in live streaming via the internet
- 2007: Dolce & Gabbana becomes a digital publisher, launching its magazine Swide.com
- 2009: The D&G e-store opens in partnership with Yoox
- 2009: D&G is the first to invite fashion bloggers to sit in the front row at its fashion shows
- 2010: Pre-show press conference with Domenico Dolce and Stefano Gabbana via YouTube. Snack videos are posted, previewing the collection themes
- 2010: Stefano Gabbana opens a Twitter account, riding the personal branding trend
- 2011: Stefano Gabbana opens his own Tumblr account

BoF: From fashion curation to faux shopping with Lyst

26 Apr

There was an interesting post on The Business of Fashion last week which looked at the rise of a new generation of niche social curation sites.

Included were the likes of virtual pinboard Pinterest (love) and “Tumblr meets Amazon” platform Svpply (need to learn more about). The focus however was on Lyst. “Fashion has emerged as one of the most popular categories on these sites and even sparked specialist services,” writes the BoF’s managing editor, Vikram Alexei Kansara.

Accordingly, inspired by the likes of Last.fm and Pandora, Lyst is designed to enable the discovery of fashion online.

“Right now it’s hard to [do this]” said Lyst’s CEO Chris Morton. “The space is becoming increasingly fragmented: every day there are new online retailers, designers and blogs, making it even harder to sift through all the noise.”

Users can create their own lists of content as well as following those of their favourite designers or stylists.

The site also works with retailers in real-time, adding products or inventory as it becomes available. As a result, the service in effect is based around driving sales, therefore equally beneficial for the brand to get involved.

What I loved about this article however is the idea of “faux shopping” in fashion. “This is when a user goes to a site like Net-a-Porter, puts together an amazing shopping cart, but instead of checking out, just sighs wistfully and closes the browser. We were conscious that users were effectively creating rich content and expressing their style, but then destroying it afterwards. With Lyst, we wanted to build a service where users could keep those items for as long as they liked and share their style,” said Morton.

Read the full piece, here: Fashion 2.0 | Social Curation Start-ups Target Fashion Industry

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