Archive | March, 2012

New Roger Vivier line inspires digital puzzle

29 Mar

Roger Vivier has created an online puzzle as part of the launch surrounding its new Prismick accessories line.

Based on the late designer’s love for assembling collages, the simple game invites users to reconstruct an image of one of the collecion’s handbags by dragging surrounding tangram-like shapes into its shell.

It is housed on the brand’s website, which is also designed to reflect similar geometric patterns, tying in with the overall theme of the collection, as conceived by current creative  director, Bruno Frisoni (and as pictured below).

“Pumps and bags which play with fluctuating geometry,” reads an update on the Roger Vivier Facebook page. “A jigsaw puzzle in three dimensions.”

Chanel’s Little Black Jacket exhibit launches online

27 Mar

Elle Fanning as featured in Chanel's Little Black Jacket digital exhibition

Chanel has unveiled a digital rendition of its new Little Black Jacket photography exhibition, showcasing 113 pictures of celebrities and personalities taken by Karl Lagerfeld.

Thelittleblackjacket.chanel.com follows on from the brand’s book of the same name by Lagerfeld and Carine Roitfeld, available from autumn 2012, and the opening of its physical exhibition in Tokyo last week.

Included are shots of Charlotte Gainsbourg, Kirsten Dunst, Baptiste Giabiconi, Sarah Jessica Parker, Lily Donaldson, Stella Tennant, Yoko One, Elle Fanning (as pictured) and more. Each one is featured as though part of a rotating cylinder, random in its delivery and clickable to reveal full detail.

See below too for a summary video of the launch event of the main exhibition in Tokyo, or click here for a behind-the-scenes from the shoot itself.

Highlights from Ted Baker’s digital drawing room initiative

26 Mar

Ted Baker’s saw a 75% increase in reach on Facebook, and a 1000% rise in Twitter mentions off the back of its “Ted’s Drawing Room” campaign on March 17.

The initiative, created by agency Guided Collective, invited 11 top illustrators to recreate consumer looks from Instagram as pieces of original artwork, as previously reported here.

Footage of the illustrators at work in Ted’s London HQ, was broadcast back into stores throughout the day, as well as on Facebook. Over 2000 viewers tuned in, for an average of 26 minutes each. The stream was also viewed in over 23 countries ranging from the UK and USA to Japan, Malaysia and Taiwan.

Below is a summary video of the event, as well as several more of the final images. Check out Ted Baker’s Facebook page to see the whole gallery.

 

Digital snippets: Faberge, DKNY, Ferragamo, Coach, Siri, Shoptiques

24 Mar

Some more great stories from around the web surrounding all things fashion and digital over the past week:

  • Faberge to launch e-commerce site [Forbes]
  • DKNY PR Girl’s tweet feat (as pictured) [WWD]
  • Salvatore Ferragamo releases fashion short The Signorina Story to push new fragrance [The Cut]
  • What Siri means for the future of mobile shopping [eMarketer]
  • Fashion start-up Shoptiques takes aim at $20bn industry [Inc]

Infographic: UK retail’s earned media mentions in February

22 Mar

Harvey Nichols proved one of the highest mentioned retailers in the UK during London Fashion Week thanks to its exclusive launch of the Victoria by Victoria Beckham collection, according to a new barometer released by Gorkana looking at earned media trends in February.

Topshop and Asos were also present, alongside the perhaps more surprising PC World and Curry’s; the result of a designer dress made from 500m of electric cables.

Overall, the lead retailer in both mainstream and social media mentions during the month, was Tesco, with 11,180 and 99,07 references respectively. Other grocery stores including Asda and Sainsbury’s also feature on both lists, an interesting comparison with the fashion industry, which saw mainstream media focusing more on department stores including Marks & Spencer, John Lewis and House of Fraser, compared to social media’s reference to Asos, Topshop, Primark and H&M.

Other big subjects mentioned in February included Valentine’s, of course, as well as David Beckham for his new Bodywear line at H&M.

See the full infographic with all the stats below:

McQueen unveils website redesign, incorporates McQ line and digital scarf boutique

19 Mar

Alexander McQueen has relaunched its website to incorporate contemporary label, McQ, in its own branded area, and offer the largest breadth of shoppable McQueen product anywhere online.

The redesign focuses on large, rich imagery to showcase the craftsmanship of the collections, as well as content to tell the story behind them. New dynamic lookbooks are fully shoppable across women’s, men’s and accessories, while a ‘More McQueen’ tab offers additional runway video, ad campaigns and access to pre-collections. Meanwhile, a separate experience area also houses info on special projects such as 2011′s Savage Beauty exhibition at the Costume Institute in New York.

A highlight feature also lies in the ‘digital scarf boutique’, which offers consumers multiple colour combinations of the brand’s iconic skull scarf, as well as exclusive prints.

Users can also curate their favourite items (from products through to campaigns) and save them under the ‘My McQueen’ header, and from there, share them across their social networks.

The relaunch also sees McQueen expand its e-commerce business from just the US and UK, across the EU.

Digital snippets: Selfridges, Karl Lagerfeld, Bergdorfs, Nike, Mr Porter, Gap

18 Mar

Some more great stories from around the web surrounding all things fashion and digital over the past week:

 

  • Selfridges launches The Film Project with Alexander McQueen (as above), Comme des Garçons, Dries Van Noten, Gareth Pugh, A.F. Vandervorst and Rick Owens [Karl is my Unkle]
  • Karl Lagerfeld launches new content-driven website [WWD]
  • Bergdorf Goodman partners with magazine app Zite to push brand-relevant lifestyle content [Marketwire]
  • Mr Porter launches global augmented reality fashion hunt [Mashable]
  • Nike showcasing ‘future of retail’ with pop-up Nike+ FuelStation in London [Creativity Online]
  • Gap launches new campaign integrating geo-fencing technology [PSFK]

BOF: Looking back at #SXSW Interactive

17 Mar

Covering the rise of the connected fan, through to the uneven impact of curation, not to mention the success of Nike and Amex in Austin, this is a great round-up piece by The Business of Fashion on everything that happened during SXSW Interactive. Check it out.

#SXSW Interactive: Fashion’s greatest challenge lies in realigning production with communications

16 Mar

“If I were the CEO of a major fashion brand today, my focus would be on trying to compress the production cycle so it realigned with communications,” Imran Amed, founder and editor of The Business of Fashion, said at SXSW earlier this week.

Speaking on a panel called Who needs a fashion cycle? I’ve got social media, he explained that we’re at the beginning of a seismic change in the way consumers communicate with each other, make decisions, and ultimately purchase.  It’s only by changing the operational side of what we do, he said, that we’re going to be able to catch up.

As we all know, the internet has revolutionised this industry. Where once fashion shows were private trade events, now they’re more consumer facing than ever before, highlighted Michelle Sadlier, global digital communications consultant for Karla Otto International, and moderator of the session.

Designer collections used to only be seen by the public when they hit shop floors six months later – or the pages of the magazines just before. Now they’re viewable in real-time. The likes of Twitter and Instagram, not to mention bloggers and live-streams, mean consumers have the same level of access, at exactly the same time, as those invited to the catwalk presentations.

The issue of course, is that the operational side of the process is still the same. Rather than speeding up alongside, production has remained a lengthy and complicated system. The user is subsequently seeing something online, that isn’t available to buy for a further four to six months.

This gap, said Chris Morton, founder and CEO of fashion discovery site Lyst, means brands are missing out on capturing that “intent to purchase at the point of inspiration”.

He referenced a handful of companies attempting to address this: Burberry’s Runway to Reality initiative – where viewers can shop straight from the catwalk for delivery in just eight weeks – for example, as well as start-up Moda Operandi, which offers a similar solution across a variety of brand names.

Lyst itself launched a Runway Tracking service last September, which at least reminds consumers of the items they liked, by sending them a notification once they’re available to buy.

Amed however, said while each of these ideas is attempting to work around the issues, they’re not actually solving the problem. This is the industry’s biggest challenge, he added, and there’s no easy solution.

One of his suggestions was to create two separate events around the shows. One small and quiet for trade to see the season ahead, and the other a big, all-out affair for consumers, timed so it’s in sync with the actual season. So in other words, shifting the position of the fashion show as we know it today, so it sits at the end of the cycle rather than the beginning.

Of course to do so, would mean skipping a season, something Natalie Massanet, founder of Net-a-Porter, first suggested to Amed in an interview in 2010. No mean feat to pull off…

Which takes us back full circle to the very first line of this post. At the end of the day the company that masters how to realign the production cycle with the communications one, will be the one that finds success. And the likeliest way of achieving that right now, is by focusing first on compressing operations.

Watch this space.

#SXSW Interactive: a new must on the fashion calendar

15 Mar

I have just returned from the most incredible week at SXSW Interactive, where speakers varied from Al Gore and Sean Parker, to Ray Kurweil, Biz Stone and Dennis Crowley.

I’m in the midst of finishing off a piece on the key thoughts and ideas from the week – to be published elsewhere [UPDATE: if you're interested please email me for a copy].

In the meantime, I wanted to write one very short and simple blogpost that says, if you’re a fashion brand aiming to achieve anything along the lines of digital success, you need to go next year.

SXSW is the place to hear industry leaders (aforementioned and more) give expert insights; it’s the place to learn about new innovations and source fresh inspirations; and it’s the place where trends and directions for the tech world break.

But more importantly, it’s the hottest place to network with anyone and everyone also working in this space. Serendipity as Mashable calls it here. From meeting new start-ups and coordinating with established platforms, to swapping ideas with those from your own industry, it’s the perfect playing ground for getting your head both in the game and ahead of the curve.

And if that isn’t convincing enough, it speaks volumes to see which brands are already doing it. There this year were teams from Burberry, Victoria’s Secret, Calvin Klein, Ralph Lauren, DKNY, Neiman Marcus, Bergdorfs, Net-a-Porter and Moda Operandi… not to mention fashion-specific platforms including Lyst and publications from The Business of Fashion and WGSN, to Fashion’s Collective.

It was undoubtedly one of the most valuable experiences of my career to date.

I hope to see you there in 2013!

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